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Presbyterian moderator: Leaders should emulate Canadian Missionaries

Presbyterian moderator Reverend Brenda Bullock has expressed concern that people today opt not stand up or do what is right, but instead hide in a crowd to avoid being accountable
Published: 
Friday, January 13, 2012

 

Presbyterian moderator Reverend Brenda Bullock has expressed concern that people today opt not stand up or do what is right, but instead hide in a crowd to avoid being accountable. She also asked whether those in control today are about service above self.  In the sermon at a thanksgiving service to mark the 100th anniversary of the Naparima Girls’ High School at the school’s auditorium yesterday, Rev Bullock said local authorities should follow the example of the Canadian Missionaries who saw a need and planted a seed, not for personal gain, but to service a need. School principal Patricia Ramgoolam acknowledged the selfless contribution of the missionaries who set high standards, as well as the stakeholders who continue the tradition of excellence 100 years later.
 
Before a congregation, which included Dr Jean Ramjohn-Richards, wife of President George Maxwell Richards, Rev Bullock said the intention of the Canadian missionaries when they planted the seed 100 years ago, was a noble one. She said it created opportunities for a neglected segment of the population—the daughters of indentured East Indian servants who were left behind, while boys were allowed to be educated. “They worked hard to enhance and enrich the lives of those girls and allowed change that has affected an entire nation. Those who worked to establish this institution did not care for personal gain, but to service a need. “As we look at the past, we cannot help but look to where we are today, and ask those who are in control, do they have this sense of call, this sense of commitment, sense of dedication, vocation and employment? “Do they see need rather than entitlement? Do they work to uplift others rather than self?”
 
She said the next few months would be a turning point for the school as many members of staff, including the principal, would be retiring from the school. “A new chapter is being written. What will they write? Will they maintain standards of yesterday? Will they be able to lift or lower the standard?” she asked. “Today many people don’t want to stand up for what is right and do what is right. It is better to hide in a crowd so no one would be held accountable.” Rev Bullock urged the school’s new administrators to retain their integrity and sense of purpose so the institution would continue for another 100 years.

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